Honors College Thesis

 

The Women's March 2017: Predicting Participation in an Unprecedented Protest Public Deposited

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  • On January 21, 2017, the United States bore witness to the largest single-day demonstration in history—the Women’s March. This mixed methods study uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative data in an attempt to predict participation in this infamous protest. I divulge the ways in which the 2017 Women’s March was similar to other protest demonstrations as well as the ways in which the March defies previously determined standards of protest participation. In understanding the ways in which the Women’s March is an outlier among its peers, I also uncover a phenomenon they’ve coined The Women’s March Effect. This effect, as I define it, claims that the Women’s March served as gateway protest for marchers to continue to protest in subsequent protest demonstrations and marches. Key Words: Women’s March, protest, participation, Trump, women
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  • Ongoing Research
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  • 2018-06-07 to 2019-07-08

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