Honors College Thesis

 

Ethical Considerations of Transgenic Biotechnology as a Tool to Address Global Food Insecurity : Implementation and Regulation in Developing Countries Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/honors_college_theses/5h73pz067

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • Transgenic biotechnology holds enormous potential as a tool to address global food insecurity. Transgenic food crops have been shown to increase food availability and food system security by incorporating disease, pesticide and drought resistance. Production costs of transgenic crops are lower due to the reduced need for costly pesticides and manual tillage, leaving more disposable income for farmers to buy food. Biofortified and nutritionally enriched transgenic crops may be able to reduce vitamin and micronutrient deficiencies. Despite the many promising applications of transgenic food crops in developing countries, many governments have raised major objections to the utilization of transgenic food production and have resisted transgenic crop adoption. The majority of these objections appear to be rooted in societal values, economics related to trade, and ethical principles, not biophysical science. My analysis of the current regulatory system suggests that ethical considerations regarding transgenic food crops are best addressed as part of local regulations rather than incorporated in global trade restrictions. I argue that while there is no silver bullet for solving world hunger, the utilization and responsible regulation of biotechnology could meaningfully contribute its reduction.
License
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Non-Academic Affiliation
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kassena Hillman (kassena.hillman@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-09-11T22:18:42ZNo. of bitstreams: 1Stepper_Shelby_UHCThesisf.pdf: 660611 bytes, checksum: e067406c01f821174360e93762b5f821 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-09-15T16:33:25Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1Stepper_Shelby_UHCThesisf.pdf: 660611 bytes, checksum: e067406c01f821174360e93762b5f821 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-09-15T16:33:25Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1Stepper_Shelby_UHCThesisf.pdf: 660611 bytes, checksum: e067406c01f821174360e93762b5f821 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

In Collection:

Items