Honors College Thesis

 

The InfluenceofExternalFocusofAttentionFeedbackonACLInjuryRelatedLandingBiomechanics Public

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/honors_college_theses/m613n046f

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • Title: The Influence of External Focus of Attention Feedback on ACL Injury Related Landing Biomechanics Purpose: To investigate whether a one-­time dose of external feedback would result in immediate changes in landing biomechanics related to ACL injury risk and if any changes are retained after 48 hours. Methods: We used a nine camera motion capture system (Vicon, Inc.) using a standard retro-­‐reflective marker set (25 static, 21 dynamic) to capture lower limb kinematics of 16 healthy female and 15 healthy male subjects during a double leg jump landing task. Kinematic data was then combined with force place data to calculate the three-­dimensional loads at the knee joint using standard inverse dynamics. Following Baseline measurement of landing biomechanics, participants were assigned to either a Control or a Feedback group and were assessed immediately following the intervention (Intervention) and 48 hours later (Retention). Results: We identified a significant main effect for Group (F₁,₂₉= 5.469, P = 0.026) for knee flexion angle at initial contact, but found no significant Time or Group*Time interaction effects (P > 0.05). Participants in the Feedback group exhibited significantly greater knee flexion at initial contact than Control participants across all testing conditions. With respect to frontal plane kinematics, there were no significant main effects for Time or Group, and no significant Group*Time interaction effect for frontal plane knee angle at initial contact (P > 0.05) No significant Time, Group, or Group*Time interaction effects were identified for peak knee extension moment (P > 0.05). There was a significant main effect for Time (F₂,₅₈= 4.398, P = 0.017) for peak anterior tibial shear force, but no significant main effect for Group or Group*Time interaction effect were identified (P > 0.05). Peak anterior tibial shear force was approximately 9% greater at Retention than at Baseline), but no differences were identified between Baseline and Intervention or Intervention and Retention. Finally, no significant main effects for Time or Group, and no significant Group*Time interaction were identified for peak knee varus moment (P > 0.05). Conclusion: A one-­‐time dose of externally focused feedback without practice did not change landing biomechanics related to ACL injury risk. It may be that feedback-­‐ related movement changes require the inclusion of agility or strengthening components, or a provision that individuals are allotted with time to practice the task.
License
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Non-Academic Affiliation
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-10-03T15:40:32Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1Weilbrenner_James_UHCThesis_FullThesis.pdf: 1535707 bytes, checksum: 4e87fca04c4f9cec138b646c4d690b4a (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kassena Hillman (kassena.hillman@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-09-11T20:49:42ZNo. of bitstreams: 1Weilbrenner_James_UHCThesis_FullThesis.pdf: 1535707 bytes, checksum: 4e87fca04c4f9cec138b646c4d690b4a (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-10-03T15:40:32Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1Weilbrenner_James_UHCThesis_FullThesis.pdf: 1535707 bytes, checksum: 4e87fca04c4f9cec138b646c4d690b4a (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

In Collection:

Items