Honors College Thesis

 

Uranium Uptake for Capsicum Annuum in Various Growing Conditions Public

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/honors_college_theses/v118rg544

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  • Uranium is naturally radioactive and commonly found in water, soil, and rock. It can occur in elevated concentrations due to the presence of ore bearing bodies and be concentrated through human activities. This research focuses on uranium uptake for Capsicum annuum for three growing conditions. These include a set of plants grown in hydroponic systems, and two traditionally grown, one with a single acute spike and the other with constant contamination. In addition to the dose scenarios there are two controls, a hydroponic and a traditionally grown. The commercially grown pepper plants were cropped to remove mature seed pods. The plants were then allowed to grow (uncontaminated) until new peppers were just forming. At that point, uranium as uranyl acetate was added. Uranyl acetate was dissolved in water to a concentration of 50 µg/mL for the hydroponic and the constant contamination group. The one-time spike contained the same amount of uranium as the total constant contamination traditionally grown plants, but applied in one application such that concentration was 700 g/mL applied in 50 mL. The peppers collected prior and post contamination were analyzed using neutron activation analysis (NAA). Uranium concentration ratios (soil to plant) were developed for the different growing conditions. While uranium concentrations were larger in traditionally contaminated plants than hydroponic systems, uranium concentrations in soils were larger than in hydroton; thus, concentration ratios for hydroponic systems were larger than traditionally contaminated systems.
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  • This research is based on work supported, in part, by the U. S. Department of Energy, under Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC01-06EW07053 entitled 'The Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation III' awarded to Oregon State University.
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