Horseclam condition studies Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/technical_reports/ft848r22f

The first regulations restricting clamming in Oregon were put into effect in 1948. Initial rules barred clamming from January 1 through June 30; clammers objected that this was too restrictive and lobbied for more time to take shellfish. This 1949 document examines the fat gaper or horseclam, to see when its condition was at its best in Oregon, in order to determine the best times for open clamming seasons. The authors concluded that they needed more information about the winter months before they could contemplate a change. This document gives a good example of earlier natural resource management and decision-making. Includes charts and hand-drawn illustrations of clams.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • no.18
Non-Academic Affiliation
Series
Keyword
Subject
Rights Statement
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome) using Capture Perfect 3.0.82 on a Canon DR-9080C in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-06-28T20:06:19Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 HorseclamCondition1949PR18.pdf: 637828 bytes, checksum: 6b3b3ba8fa61a3b5eb7212d4cfdbf99b (MD5) Previous issue date: 1949
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Susan Gilmont (susan.gilmont@orst.edu) on 2013-06-26T16:21:05Z No. of bitstreams: 1 HorseclamCondition1949PR18.pdf: 637828 bytes, checksum: 6b3b3ba8fa61a3b5eb7212d4cfdbf99b (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-06-28T20:06:19Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HorseclamCondition1949PR18.pdf: 637828 bytes, checksum: 6b3b3ba8fa61a3b5eb7212d4cfdbf99b (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items