Crown Gall of Grape Rootstocks 1997-1998 Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/technical_reports/k930bz290

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  • Crown gall can develop on grapevines wounded by freezing temperatures, mechanical damage or grafting. Pathogenic agrobacteria residing within the vascular system are able to initiate tumor growth in damaged plant cells. Sampling from 21 sites in Oregon vineyards and nurseries yielded diverse populations of pathogenic agrobacteria. Most of the pathogenic strains isolated were biotype 3 (Agrobacterium vitis), but there were some biotype 2 strains isolated from five sites that were highly virulent. Several methods have been proposed for minimizing crown gall in grapevines. These include: 1) heat treatments to kill bacteria within plants, 2) planting grafted grapevines growing on rootstocks that are tolerant to pathogenic agrobacteria and 3) planting clean grapevines into disease-free soil. Research at Oregon State University over the past few years has resulted in progress in these three areas. 1) Heat treatments agrobacteria subjected to 54°C (129°F) for 30 minutes killed 97 different strains isolated from grape. These same heat treatments were used on dormant cuttings of rootstocks and scion wood infiltrated with antibiotic resistant strains of pathogenic agrobacteria. No pathogenic agrobacteria were detected from sap extractions of heat-treated cuttings. The plants showed no adverse growth effects from the heat treatments when compared to non-heated controls, but one grower reported that the heat-treated rootstocks did not graft well. 2) Crown gall tolerant rootstocks. Two hybrid rootstocks (V. riparia X V. rupestris) 101-24 Millardet et de Grasset and 3309 Couderc were the most tolerant to pathogenic agrobacteria grape isolates, while 420 A Milardet et de Grasset (V riparia X V. berlandieri) was the most susceptible to crown gall of six rootstocks tested. 3) Clean grapevines in clean soil. Shoot tip culture and propagation is one way to acquire bacteria free plants (2) and soil solarization has been shown to reduce the populations of pathogenic agrobacteria in planting sites (4).
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  • Miller, M. L., Tooley, K., Ferguson, K., Toma, K., Mentzer, J., & Moore, L. W. (1998). Crown Gall of Grape Rootstocks 1997-1998. Oregon Wine Advisory Board Research Progress Report.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-02-03T15:17:27Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Crown Gall of Grape Rootstocks.pdf: 171696 bytes, checksum: 0d006b5dd7bb92eebb7f24fa4e03c968 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2016-02-03T15:17:27Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Crown Gall of Grape Rootstocks.pdf: 171696 bytes, checksum: 0d006b5dd7bb92eebb7f24fa4e03c968 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1998
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-02-03T15:17:12Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Crown Gall of Grape Rootstocks.pdf: 171696 bytes, checksum: 0d006b5dd7bb92eebb7f24fa4e03c968 (MD5)

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