Risky Behavior: Perceived Risk of Infectious Disease in Youth Entering Alcohol/Drug Treatment Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/2801ph90g

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Upon entering a residential drug and alcohol treatment, typically clients are directed to complete a risk assessment form. Risk assessment forms are anonymous, self-reported questionnaires that inquire about demographics, health, sexual behaviors, as well as drug and alcohol use. The YES house is a youth treatment facility in Corvallis Oregon that asked the Public Health department of Oregon State University to analyze their risk assessment forms from the years of 1999-2011. We cleaned and analyzed the data using SPSS Version 21.0., running frequencies on all questions within their document. We compared rates of adolescents coming into the facility by county to the population of each county. We ran an ordinal logistic regression on two questions within the form that were the patient’s perceived risk of HIV and Hepatitis C. We found that 55.1% of these patients had been to jail and 22.3% had been homeless sometime in their life. The median age was 16.4 and 64% were male. We found that for each point in the sex predictor questions they were 1.8 times more likely to perceive themselves at risk for HIV and 1.4 times more likely to perceive themselves at risk for contracting Hepatitis C. We concluded that adolescence entering YES house don’t tend to perceive themselves at risk for diseases while surprising numbers have engaged in risky behaviors at a very early age.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Non-Academic Affiliation
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Cody Manriquez (manriqco@onid.orst.edu) on 2013-05-24T20:40:05ZNo. of bitstreams: 3license_rdf: 1232 bytes, checksum: bb87e2fb4674c76d0d2e9ed07fbb9c86 (MD5)URAP poster V04.pdf: 1281871 bytes, checksum: 623efd49ba51cd9e590c884fe6ea8305 (MD5)URAP poster V04.pptx: 1062414 bytes, checksum: 7e80fc321f21fb1d21c7bf887f38709c (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-05-28T22:21:03Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 3license_rdf: 1232 bytes, checksum: bb87e2fb4674c76d0d2e9ed07fbb9c86 (MD5)URAP poster V04.pdf: 1281871 bytes, checksum: 623efd49ba51cd9e590c884fe6ea8305 (MD5)URAP poster V04.pptx: 1062414 bytes, checksum: 7e80fc321f21fb1d21c7bf887f38709c (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-28T22:21:03Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3license_rdf: 1232 bytes, checksum: bb87e2fb4674c76d0d2e9ed07fbb9c86 (MD5)URAP poster V04.pdf: 1281871 bytes, checksum: 623efd49ba51cd9e590c884fe6ea8305 (MD5)URAP poster V04.pptx: 1062414 bytes, checksum: 7e80fc321f21fb1d21c7bf887f38709c (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Last modified

Downloadable Content

Download PDF

Items