Appearance and Exam Performance Public

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/honors_college_theses/9g54xk685

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  • This undergraduate honors thesis was designed to investigate the relationship between students’ appearances and their college exam performance. The hypothesis was that if a student wears clothing that causes him or her to feel fashionable, professional, attractive, or otherwise well put together, then that student will earn higher marks on exams and experience an increased overall level of success, in comparison to if they had worn more casual, unstylish, unprofessional, or unflattering clothing. A survey was designed to question a sample of students about how they were dressed during their midterm exams, why they dressed the way they did, how they felt about the way they looked, and their performance on the exams. Forty-two Oregon State University undergraduate students participated in the study by completing the online survey. The majority of students (81%) did not dress with the intent to succeed on the exam in that they did not do anything different or special to complete their overall looks on the day of their exams. The majority of the students (67%) also wore casual wear or sports wear. The few who dressed professionally performed very well on their exams. The results were largely inconclusive and further research is needed to confirm a positive relationship between dressing up for an exam and academic performance.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kassena Hillman (kassena.hillman@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-07-28T21:28:37ZNo. of bitstreams: 1Casey Lane Anderson Honors Thesis.pdf: 480061 bytes, checksum: fd2eac217b670b05abe3df06160d27e2 (MD5)
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