Undergraduate Thesis Or Project

 

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  • The Willamette Valley, west of the Cascade mountain range in the state of Oregon, is home to a growing number of vineyards. This rather recent, booming industry of the region has become an important component of the economy of the state’s agriculture since the late 1960’s, contributing more than $1.56 billion in 2010 (USDA NASS). Disease control is an important element of maintaining the quality of grapes for use in wine and keeping the industry healthy. This can be costly and frustrating for growers and viticulturists. Of the many viruses that affect grapes, Grapevine leafroll associated virus-3 (GLRaV-3) is the most common (Tsai et al., 2008)and could become an issue in the Willamette Valley. It has been reported that the titer of GLRaV-3 increases during the growing season and that the most reliable detection is in the late summer and autumn. This is based on work using serological assays such as ELISA. Proposed research project was (1) to quantify the increases of GLRaV-3 RNA weekly during the growing season for two consecutive years and (2) compare differences in sugar level, elasticity, and color index properties between healthy and GLRaV-3 infected fruit during the ripening phase. In the trial involving young leaf tissue, GLRaV-3 titer quantified for 2010 illustrated a 210-, or 1,000-fold total increase over the duration of the growing season (Fig. 3a), and 212-, or 4,000-fold increase for the year 2011 (Fig. 3b). GLRaV-3 titer in young leaf tissues displayed the greatest increase throughout the growing season in all plants relative to initial titer at week one (Fig. 3a,b). This is most likely due to a reduced rate of plant growth as the season progressed in the young leaves, allowing for virus titer increase on a tissue weight basis. . Middle-aged and mature leaves develop a leathery feel because of a more developed cuticle, which offers more protection to the plant from biotic and abiotic elements, but is harder to wash and separate from RNA in the extraction process. As seen in Figure 4e, mature leaf tissue from the 114/Gloire grafted clone displayed little amplification. Leaf protecting cuticles could be the cause of this from inhibition of RNA extraction, or inhibition of enzymatic activity during the RT or PCR steps; however, the same trend was not observed in 2011 (Figure 4f).
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Wanda Crannell (brr@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-12-17T18:03:20Z No. of bitstreams: 2 Sarah Wright Poster 2012.pdf: 613660 bytes, checksum: df1c88e210429a79f38055e80960f445 (MD5) wright final Thesis.pdf: 908880 bytes, checksum: 041a40cfc7243be125adc41ad6e06481 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-12-19T22:23:39Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 Sarah Wright Poster 2012.pdf: 613660 bytes, checksum: df1c88e210429a79f38055e80960f445 (MD5) wright final Thesis.pdf: 908880 bytes, checksum: 041a40cfc7243be125adc41ad6e06481 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-12-19T22:23:40Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 Sarah Wright Poster 2012.pdf: 613660 bytes, checksum: df1c88e210429a79f38055e80960f445 (MD5) wright final Thesis.pdf: 908880 bytes, checksum: 041a40cfc7243be125adc41ad6e06481 (MD5)

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