Emotions and Content Themes associated with Substance Imagery in Hip-Hop and R&B YouTube Music Videos Public

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/honors_college_theses/cj82k936r

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  • YouTube is a free video watching and uploading site that allows endorsing and sharing of videos. Youth and adolescents as top viewers of YouTube may be exposed to images and messages on tobacco, marijuana and alcohol use behaviors. The research project entailed deriving a list of songs from the 2014 Billboard Top 25 Weekly Hot Hip-Hop and R&B songs, resulting in 112 unique ranked song titles. Of the 112 songs, 95 songs had official music videos. The videos of the songs were downloaded from a website that converted YouTube video links to MP4 videos. Three independent reviewers who created the coding scheme initiated the coding process. From there, 95 videos were coded to obtain the results that were presented. Out of 95 videos viewed, 74 percent (n=70) contained at least one substance reference or image. Alcohol and marijuana substance imagery were associated with emotional and content themes of "relaxed‟, "partying‟, and "having a good time.‟ Multiple music videos featured product placement of alcohol brands (e.g. GTV, MYX, Ciroc, Zing, and Cavoda) and hookah machinery brand, BLOW Hookah. Other findings included the presentation of children surrounded by substance in three music videos. With the findings in this research, public health practitioners can address the imagery portrayed in these videos that can influence youth to form norms about alcohol, tobacco, alternative tobacco, marijuana, and illicit substances. Key Words: Emotions, content themes, associations, substance use, substance implied use, Hip-Hop, R&B, YouTube, YouTube music videos, music videos
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Steven Van Tuyl(steve.vantuyl@oregonstate.edu) on 2017-03-20T20:38:24Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2license_rdf: 1232 bytes, checksum: bb87e2fb4674c76d0d2e9ed07fbb9c86 (MD5)ChristinaChac_Thesis_Final_2017.pdf: 1573473 bytes, checksum: edd00248608b3e36b33f2caea9ae4b22 (MD5)
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