Undergraduate Thesis Or Project

 

Characterization of super-low frequency electromagnetic fields produced by an undersea transmission cable in a homogeneous fluid Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/d791sh796

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • Offshore renewable energy, an untapped energy resource in the United States, has the potential to stimulate job creation and diversify the world’s energy portfolio. Transmission cables are used to transfer electrical power to the mainland. These cables carry a harmonic time-dependent current. This current in turn generates both an electric and magnetic field. Although the electric field can be shielded from the marine environment, it is not economically feasible to use high permeability materials to shield the magnetic field. The magnetic field induces an electric field in the water surrounding the transmission cable. The sensory perception and migration of fish and mammalian species can be caused by perturbations in the electric and magnetic fields. This research focuses on determining the magnitude of both the magnetic field and the induced electric field. It is hoped that through a better understanding of the fields created by these transmission cables, marine conservation can be promoted and renewable wave energy can be further developed. Several analytic models are compared for the radial and axial electric field. The magnitude of the magnetic field and its induced electric field in seawater are experimentally measured, and the ability to predict the electric field through a derivation of Maxwell’s equation similar to the statement by Shakur et al is evaluated experimentally. A derivation using polarization potentials (Hertz vectors) employed by Sommerfeld et al is used to model the induced electric field. The magnetic field is measured using a Hall magnetometer. Electric fields are measured using standard reference graphite electrodes. The magnetic field is modeled using Maxwell’s equations; there is excellent overlap of the experimental data and theoretical model. The traditional model of dealing with the fields directly fails to accurately model the data for a single copper conductor in both the near and far field regions. There is excellent correlation between the model proposed by Sommerfeld and the measured data.
License
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Rights Statement
Related Items
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
  • This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG36-08GO18179.
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-05-13T20:35:44Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1PommerenckThesis Final Print Version.pdf: 4596657 bytes, checksum: d6cdd51b7114024322f124fa33e8dccc (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-05-13T20:35:44Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1PommerenckThesis Final Print Version.pdf: 4596657 bytes, checksum: d6cdd51b7114024322f124fa33e8dccc (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Patricia Black (patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-05-13T20:32:03ZNo. of bitstreams: 1PommerenckThesis Final Print Version.pdf: 4596657 bytes, checksum: d6cdd51b7114024322f124fa33e8dccc (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items