Characterization and application of PEO-containing triblock copolymer surfactants Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/f7623f45c

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • The action of pendant, polyethylene oxide (PEO) brush layers as nonfouling coatings for biomedical materials is well understood. However progress toward clinical application of stable, high density PEO coatings has historically been impeded by the lack of cost effective, noninvasive methods for their preparation. Triblock polymers featuring a hydrophobic, polypropylene oxide (PPO) or polybutadiene (PB) centerblock flanked by two PEO side chains can be used to coat the surfaces of hydrophobic biomedical materials, and in this way render them less prone to protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. Optimal coating requires awarenesss of triblock aggregation properties, and for this purpose pyrene fluorescence quenching was used to determine the critical aggregation concentration of the triblocks used in this work. Coatings produced by radiolytic grafting of PEO-PB-PEO triblocks to polyacrylonitrile membranes used in hemodialysis were evaluated in relation to impact on urea permeability through the membrane. Neither the PEO-PBD-PEO triblocks nor the irradiation process was observed to have any effect on membrane permeability to urea. Beyond issues surrounding biocompatibility, PEO coatings can potentially be used to entrap and later release bioactive peptides for short-term medical device applications. In this context pyrene fluorescence quenching was used to determine the existence of a hydrophobic inner region of PEO layers based on PEO-PPO-PEO triblocks, substantially explaining the high affinity for entrapment previously recorded for amphiphilic peptides.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Advisor
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Rights Statement
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-10T18:52:03Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Snider, Joshua_Thesis.pdf: 1267140 bytes, checksum: 25c65df32036959f829ceaa6d8cf6a78 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kassena Hillman (kassena.hillman@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-09T16:40:12Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Snider, Joshua_Thesis.pdf: 1267140 bytes, checksum: 25c65df32036959f829ceaa6d8cf6a78 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-07-10T18:52:03Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Snider, Joshua_Thesis.pdf: 1267140 bytes, checksum: 25c65df32036959f829ceaa6d8cf6a78 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/27/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items