Differences in Societal and Behavioral Attitudes toward Skin Cancer between Japanese American and Japanese Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/js956g65h

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  • The rate of melanoma among Asian American has been steadily increasing in the past five years, while in other Asian countries, such as Japan, the incident rate remains relatively the same. Does the culture and societal attitudes toward skin cancer make a difference in the incident rate of melanoma? This survey research investigated this disparity. The populations of interest were Japanese American and Japanese living in Japan. Skin tone preference, the usage of SPF contained products, hat and umbrella, skin whitening and tanning products, opinion on white and tanned skin and perceptions on skin cancer were used as premises for comparison. Contrary to the neutral opinions from Japanese American, the majority of Japanese view fondly of white skin over tanned skin.There were some distinct differences in the practice of using umbrella, whitening and tanning skin products. However, there was not a significant difference in the use of SPF-contained products. Additionally, both populations also share similar perceptions about skin cancer. Beauty value generates societal and behavioral attitudes. Since white skin preference is an important aspect valued not just as an esthetic matter but also as an indicator of social class, skin care practice is prioritized in beauty care in Japan. As a result, certain behaviors in skin cancer prevention practices found in native Japanese diverge from Japanese living in other Western countries such as America. The results for this project contribute to the understanding of cultural effects on skin protection and prevention. It has a potentially important role in public health promotion and prevention in America.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Nicholas Fleury (nick.fleury@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-01-04T19:44:13Z No. of bitstreams: 3 NguyenVananh2011.pdf: 3354505 bytes, checksum: bbf592c7aeaa382b83b84da2d82fee64 (MD5) license_rdf: 19977 bytes, checksum: 9b906c3236d4c21f75a26a164fe0d6f3 (MD5) license_text: 0 bytes, checksum: d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Sue Kunda(sue.kunda@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-01-07T00:47:48Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 3 NguyenVananh2011.pdf: 3354505 bytes, checksum: bbf592c7aeaa382b83b84da2d82fee64 (MD5) license_rdf: 19977 bytes, checksum: 9b906c3236d4c21f75a26a164fe0d6f3 (MD5) license_text: 0 bytes, checksum: d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e (MD5)

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