Standing Tall: Exploration and play in a novel modified ride-on car Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/kw52j961h

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  • Self-directed mobility is a fundamental human right. Typically developing children engage in mobility for a majority of their day, but children with disabilities do not have the same opportunities. Children with disabilities are at a disadvantage and have a greater risk for developmental delays in physical and cognitive skills, along with decreases in social interactions with peers and adults (Feldner, Logan, & Galloway, 2015). Powered mobility devices, such as motorized wheelchairs, can promote self-directed mobility experiences for children with disabilities. Lynch, Agrawal, and Galloway (2009) validated that powered mobility devices can help children with disabilities as young as six months improve communication, cognitive abilities, as well as motor skills. Unfortunately, there are no commercially available powered mobility devices for children under the age of three (Logan et al., 2014). Yet, research over the past thirty years has shown direct benefits of use of powered mobility devices (Butler, 1983; Feldner et al,, 2015). Ride-on toy cars (ROC) were mentioned as a potential powered mobility device as early as 1988. However, only recently have modified ROCs emerged as an alternative to standard powered mobility devices. Previous research has demonstrated the benefits of use of modified ROCs for children with disabilities to increase independent exploration as well as physical and cognitive development (Logan et al., 2014). An innovative sit-to-stand version was developed and requires a child to stand up in order to activate the switch to encourage the physical skills of pulling from sit-to-stand, weight bearing, and balance (Feldner et al., 2015). The purpose of this case study is to examine modified ROC use by an infant with Down syndrome (DS) to encourage sitting and standing. One infant with DS participated in this study. During baseline, Child A was provide bi-weekly driving sessions that lasted 10 minutes and were video recorded. During the intervention, Child A was provided 20 minutes of driving at least five days per week and a researcher recorded bi-weekly 10 minute driving sessions. Child A initially drove the car in the seated mode, but transitioned over time to the standing mode. From baseline to intervention, the frequency of positive and negative facial expressions increased and decreased respectively. Modified ROCs are an affordable and fun option for children with DS. They provide opportunities in social and physical growth and may help close the developmental gap between children with DS and typically developing children.
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