Efficacy of entomopathogenic fungi for control of the cabbage maggot, Delia radicum (L.) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) Public Deposited

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  • The cabbage maggot, Delia radicum (L.) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) is a serious pest of cruciferous crops (i.e. broccoli, cabbage, turnip, rutabaga) in North America and Europe (Coaker and Finch, 1971; Whistlecraft et al., 1985). The adult flies lay eggs around the base and in cracks at the soil surface around wild and domesticated cruciferous plants and in cracks at the soil surface. Larvae can seriously reduce crop quality and yield by feeding directly on the roots (Jensen et al., 2002). In root crops such as rutabaga and turnip, maggots can render the crop unmarketable if more than slight feeding damage is evident at harvest. Although some cultural controls such as crop rotation, row covers, and cultivation are used, current cabbage maggot control measures depend almost solely on the use of chemical insecticides (Jyoti et al., 2001). The most commonly used pesticide in the Pacific Northwest is chlorpyrifos (i.e. Lorsban), an organophosphate. Environmental scrutiny, strict regulation, and the potential for chemical resistance have raised an interest in pursuing alternative control methods. An overlooked method for controlling the cabbage maggot may be the use of the entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae). Metarhizium anisopliae and B. bassiana have been evaluated for control against other pests such as corn rootworm (Krueger et al., 1997), flea beetle (Butt et al., 1997), onion maggot (Majchrowicz et al., 1990), and chinch bug (Ramoska and Todd, 1985). The objectives of these experiments were to determine the efficacy of M anisopliae and B. bassiana in controlling D. radicum in laboratory soil bioassays at economic field rates, identify the most virulent isolate and determine the LD50 and LD95 of the most virulent isolate. 20
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