Honors College Thesis

 

The Effects of Sex and Task on Biomechanical Factors Related to ACL Injury Public

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/honors_college_theses/v692t806x

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  • Title: Curren, M. The Effects of Sex and Task on Biomechanical Factors Related to ACL Injury Purpose: To investigate the influences of sex and task on biomechanical factors associated with ACL injury. Methods: We used a nine camera motion capture system (Vicon, Inc.) using a standard retroreflective marker set (25 static, 21 dynamic) sampled at 120 Hz to capture lower limb kinematics of 14 healthy male and 16 healthy female subjects during double leg jump landing and side-step cutting. Kinematic data was used combined force place data to calculate the three-dimensional loads at the knee joint during tasks using standard inverse dynamics. Results: Females and males demonstrated greater peak anterior tibial shear force (ATSF) and knee extension moment (KEM) (P <.001) during side-step cutting than during double-leg jump landing. However, no main effects for sex (ATSF: P = 0.198; KEM: P = 0.081) or sex*task interaction effects (ATSF: P = 0.115; KEM: P = 0.191) were identified. We identified a main effect for sex in which females exhibited greater knee valgus angle at initial contact (P = 0.003) and greater peak knee valgus angle (P = 0.011) than males. Knee valgus angle at initial contact was also greater for both sexes during side-step cutting (P = 0.006). No other main effects or sex*task interaction effects were identified (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Males and females demonstrate less favorable sagittal plane knee kinetics related to ACL injury during SSC than DLJL. However, sex does not modify this effect. The results support that a SSC is more challenging to perform than DLJL, and the use of this more difficult task may better differentiate the use of “high-risk” biomechanics when comparing groups that may not be evident when using a less challenging task. All participants displayed greater knee valgus angle at IC during SSC, but there was not a difference between tasks for peak knee valgus angle. Females also consistently displayed greater peak and IC knee valgus angles than males. However, it is likely that the small magnitudes of these differences (< 3°) are not clinically significant.
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-07-10T18:39:28Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1MCurren Honors Thesis The Effects of Task and Sex as Biomechanical Factors in Relation to ACL Injury .pdf: 441114 bytes, checksum: f63f7b3efe8773d297ff13c706190c62 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-10T18:39:28Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1MCurren Honors Thesis The Effects of Task and Sex as Biomechanical Factors in Relation to ACL Injury .pdf: 441114 bytes, checksum: f63f7b3efe8773d297ff13c706190c62 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kassena Hillman (kassena.hillman@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-09T16:16:34ZNo. of bitstreams: 1MCurren Honors Thesis The Effects of Task and Sex as Biomechanical Factors in Relation to ACL Injury .pdf: 441114 bytes, checksum: f63f7b3efe8773d297ff13c706190c62 (MD5)

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