Effects of Estrogen Receptor Blockade on Skeletal Response to Alcohol in Ovariectomized Rats Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/vx021g843

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Heavy alcohol consumption reduces peak bone mass in growing rodents and can lead to bone loss in both adult rats and humans. In contrast, moderate alcohol consumption appears to have a bone sparing effect in post-menopausal women. Alcohol has been reported to increase aromatase activity and influence estrogen receptor (ER) number and signaling in rats. Thus, both the putative protective and detrimental effects of alcohol on the skeleton may be mediated through altered estrogen signaling. We determined whether blocking estrogen receptor signaling using ICI 182,780 (ICI), a potent estrogen receptor antagonist, influences the skeletal response to heavy alcohol consumption in ovariectomized (ovx) rats with established bone loss. Three weeks following ovariectomy, rats were divided into five groups: 1) baseline, 2) control + vehicle, 3) control + ICI, 4) alcohol + VEH, 5) alcohol + ICI and were treated accordingly for 4 weeks. Tibiae were evaluated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and micro-computed tomography (μCT). Alcohol consumption decreased weight gain and bone mass accrual but increased percent body fat. Bone microarchitecture of the tibia was also altered by alcohol consumption. Specifically, there was a reduction in the overall accrual of cortical bone and net loss of cancellous bone. Co-treatment with ICI had no independent effects and did not alter the skeletal response to alcohol. In conclusion, alcohol resulted in cancellous and cortical osteopenia but we found no evidence in ovx rats to support the hypothesis that changes in ER signaling mediate the detrimental skeletal actions of alcohol.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Grantor
Advisor
Committee Member
Non-Academic Affiliation
Keyword
Rights Statement
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Sue Kunda(sue.kunda@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-06-21T22:09:49Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Lindsay Wagner Thesis.pdf: 351373 bytes, checksum: 7db0dd2bca50924610e3412b6359777f (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Emily Dray (emily.dray@oregonstate.edu) on 2012-06-11T18:48:45Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Lindsay Wagner Thesis.pdf: 351373 bytes, checksum: 7db0dd2bca50924610e3412b6359777f (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2012-06-21T22:09:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Lindsay Wagner Thesis.pdf: 351373 bytes, checksum: 7db0dd2bca50924610e3412b6359777f (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012-05-29

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/27/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items