Emotional Intelligence: Improvement Through Exposure Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/ww72bd11d

Beaver Interpersonal Sensitivity Project (B.I.S.P.)

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  • Those scoring high in emotional intelligence typically can read the room well, understand relational connections, detect deception, and other various aspects of human interaction. But how do we learn to be emotionally intelligent? When it comes to interpersonal perception, it turns out to be difficult to learn from our mistakes because we rarely get this feedback. How often do we find out definitively whether the person we suspect is lying is telling the truth or not? Given there is no answer key against which we can evaluate the validity of our judgments; the possibility exists that people might get better simply through doing it. Perhaps we can learn something simply by taking the test over and over again even if we are never told what the correct answers are. In the present study, emotional intelligence was measured through two tests: Interpersonal Perception Task (IPT) and the Profile of Nonverbal Sensitivity (PONS). Both are video based tests where the test taker is asked questions about the people they are watching. We had 15 participants (11 females and 4 males) that took both tests nine times over a period of nine weeks. Participants were not told how well they did, or were given any information about any item or about any strategy that would lead to scoring well. The scores were analyzed to determine whether testing alone (i.e. no training, and no feedback) would lead to a significant improvement in performance. In other words, we wanted to find out if people could become better at reading people simply by trying to read the same person over and over again. We found that there was support for the notion that scores on the emotional intelligence tests would increase with more exposure. The IPT-15 and the PONS produced statistically significant results showing strong evidence that the scores improve by week 9. The research has provided introductory support for the idea that emotional intelligence can further develop with increased exposure, without any feedback.
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