A review and meta-analysis of the association between dairy intake and breast cancer risk in Prospective Cohort Studies Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/undergraduate_thesis_or_projects/x346d598v

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  • Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In 2012, over 220,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States. It has been hypothesized that dairy may play a role in breast cancer; however, the evidence has been inconsistent and limited. Proposed mechanisms linking dairy and breast cancer risk include: insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations; phytanic acid through alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) expression; and conjugated linoleic acid through eicosanoids production, cell signaling pathways and DNA synthesis. Objective: The aim of this study is to review literature and conduct a meta-analysis on the association between dairy intake and breast cancer risk in prospective cohort studies. Methods: We identified three review/meta-analysis articles on dairy intake and risk of breast cancer (Dong et al. 2011, Moorman et al. 2004 and Zang et al. 2015). A total of 20 studies that were conducted as prospective cohort studies and that reported associations between self-reported dairy intake during adulthood and risk of breast cancer were gathered from these articles. Relative risk (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for comparing the highest and the lowest dairy intake categories were extracted for the meta-analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of the 19 studies, after excluding one study that did not report 95% CI, using Stata 14.1. Results: For total dairy intake, 10 studies were included and showed a statistically significant inverse association with breast cancer risk [RR (95% CI) = 0.85 (0.75-0.95)]. A total of 12 studies were included for total milk intake and showed a statistically significant inverse association with breast cancer risk [RR (95% CI) = 0.87 (0.75-0.99)]. There were 6 studies included for whole milk intake and there was no statistically significant association with breast cancer risk [RR (95% CI) = 0.95 (0.79-1.11)]. A total of 3 studies were included for low-fat milk intake and did not show an association with breast cancer risk [RR (95% CI) = 0.92 (0.77-1.06)]. Conclusion: Based on our literature review and meta-analysis, total dairy and total milk intakes were statistically significantly inversely associated with breast cancer risk. In contrast, whole milk and low-fat milk intakes were not associated with breast cancer risk. More studies are needed to elucidate potential mechanisms underlying the association between dairy and breast cancer risk.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Heather Stifel (stifelh@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-06-09T17:34:18Z No. of bitstreams: 2 StifelHeatherM2016-2.pdf: 157656 bytes, checksum: 64fbbfbd76bc684395b0e6e464cbe780 (MD5) StifelHeatherM2016.pdf: 280377 bytes, checksum: ed8baee2f7dc70d69a1f70074177f1a1 (MD5)
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