mirage   mirage   mirage

Understanding physical activity behavior in inclusive physical education

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Yun, Joonkoo
dc.creator Jin, Jooyeon
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-09T23:11:10Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-09T23:11:10Z
dc.date.copyright 2012-06-21
dc.date.issued 2012-06-21
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1957/30839
dc.description Graduation date: 2013 en_US
dc.description.abstract Physical education is important to promote physical activity of adolescents with and without disabilities, but many adolescents are not active during physical education classes. Innovative instructional strategies are imperative to change this phenomenon, but it will be challenging to develop effective instructional strategies without thorough understanding of students' physical activity behavior in physical education settings. Two studies were conducted to comprehensively understand physical activity behavior of adolescents with and without disabilities in inclusive physical education classes at middle schools. The first study investigated the utility of the integrative theory to predict students' physical activity intentions and behavior at the intrapersonal level. A total of 577 participants, including 24 adolescents' with disabilities, were recruited from 8 middle schools in Korea. In a prospective design, participants' psychosocial constructs and physical activity data were collected by survey questionnaires and electronic pedometers. A multilevel (design-based) structural equation modeling using maximum likelihood estimation with robust standard error correction found that students' attitudes, subjective norms, and barrier-efficacy significantly predicted students' goal intentions. Students' implementation intentions and task-efficacy were significant predictors of physical activity behavior. In addition, implementation intentions completely mediated the relationship between goal intentions and physical activity behavior. The second study investigated three conceptual models, including process-product model, student mediation model, and ecological model, to predict students' physical activity behavior at the interpersonal and environmental levels. A total of 13 physical educators teaching inclusive physical education and their 503 students, including 22 students with disabilities, were recruited from 8 middle schools in Korea. A series of multilevel (model-based) regressions with maximum likelihood estimation showed that the ecological model was the most effective model in prediction of students' physical activity behavior. Specifically, it was found that teachers' teaching behavior and students' implementation intentions were significant predictors of the students' physical activity behavior when interacted with gender, disability, lesson contents, instructional models, and class locations. In conclusion, findings suggest that intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental predictors provide a systematic account in the understanding of students' physical activity behavior in physical education settings. Future studies should consider all three factors simultaneously to effectively develop instructional strategies that promote physical activity of adolescents' with and without disabilities in physical education classes. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Physical activity behavior en_US
dc.subject Inclusive physical education en_US
dc.subject Multi-level analysis en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Physical education for youth -- Korea en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Physical education for children with disabilities -- Korea en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Inclusive education -- Korea en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Teenagers with disabilities -- Education (Middle school) -- Korea en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Youth with disabilities -- Education (Middle school) -- Korea en_US
dc.title Understanding physical activity behavior in inclusive physical education en_US
dc.type Thesis/Dissertation en_US
dc.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.) in Exercise and Sport Science en_US
dc.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.degree.discipline Health and Human Sciences en_US
dc.degree.grantor Oregon State University en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember McCubbin, Jeff
dc.contributor.committeemember Cardinal, Brad
dc.contributor.committeemember Wegis, Heidi
dc.contributor.committeemember Flay, Brian
dc.description.peerreview no en_us


The following license files are associated with this item:

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ScholarsArchive@OSU


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics