Article

 

Doing ‘Conservation’: Effects of Different Interpretations at an Ecuadorian Volunteer Tourism Project Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/articles/n296x085h

This is the publisher’s final pdf. The published article is copyrighted by the author(s) and published by Medknow Publications. The published article can be found at:  http://www.conservationandsociety.org/.

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract
  • As more people volunteer in the name of ‘conservation,’ a careful analysis of ‘conservation’ and the actors’ underlying ideologies becomes pressing. Volunteers work on the seemingly similar goal of ‘conservation,’ but differences in interpretations can have on-the-ground impacts. In this paper, I use interviews and participant interactions to: (1) analyse how volunteers, reserve managers, and volunteer coordinators at an Ecuadorian reserve articulated ‘conservation’ in their discourse; and (2) examine how different conservation ideologies affected interactions among actors and with the environment. Using political ecology and a modified version of ideological and cluster criticism to analyse discourse, I found actors interpreted ‘conservation’ differently. I identified three ideologies presented by volunteers: Type I (preservation-oriented), Type-II (mixed), and Type-III (sustainable use-oriented); managers and coordinators held similar views as each other. Different ‘conservation’ ideologies among actors affected the project (e.g., acceptability of sustainable logging), interactions, perceptions of locals, and general attitudes towards conservation work.
Resource Type
DOI
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Grimm, K. E. (2013). Doing 'Conservation': Effects of Different Interpretations at an Ecuadorian Volunteer Tourism Project. Conservation & Society, 11(3), 264-276. doi:10.4103/0972-4923.121029
Journal Title
Journal Volume
  • 11
Journal Issue/Number
  • 3
Keyword
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
  • This research was supported by an Oregon University System-Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowship Fund (OUS-SYLFF) Graduate Fellowship for International Research.
Publisher
Peer Reviewed
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Erin Clark (erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-05-28T19:28:28Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) GrimmKerryForestryDoingConservationEffects.pdf: 374128 bytes, checksum: 7f58a403930236c220e01c388282c9e4 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2014-05-28T19:28:48Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) GrimmKerryForestryDoingConservationEffects.pdf: 374128 bytes, checksum: 7f58a403930236c220e01c388282c9e4 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-11-06
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Erin Clark(erin.clark@oregonstate.edu) on 2014-05-28T19:28:48Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1370 bytes, checksum: cd1af5ab51bcc7a5280cf305303530e9 (MD5) GrimmKerryForestryDoingConservationEffects.pdf: 374128 bytes, checksum: 7f58a403930236c220e01c388282c9e4 (MD5)

Relationships

Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items