The Influence of Network Properties on the Agility of Seafood Supply Chains Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/conference_proceedings_or_journals/3f4627400

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, held July 11-15, 2016 at Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Center (AECC), Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.

Suggested Bibliographic Reference: Challenging New Frontiers in the Global Seafood Sector: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade, July 11-15, 2016. Compiled by Stefani J. Evers and Ann L. Shriver. International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade (IIFET), Corvallis, 2016.

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  • The fisheries supply chains integrate multiple and heterogeneous agents linked through commercial (buyer/seller) relationships. In a large and competitive trade market, every agent can choose his/her partners, but the functioning of the supply chain depends on the aggregation of every agent's decisions that configures the global network of relationships. In particular, agility (the ability to quickly re-adjust to changes in the supply and demand conditions) is out of control of any particular individual, but depends on the specific structure of the supply chain network as a whole. In this study, we analyze how the agility of the supply chain can be characterized by some trade network features, such as the degree distribution (the number of partners of every agent). We show a theoretical stylized case with three classes of agents (producers, wholesalers and retailers), where the number of upstream and downstream linkages in every class follows a certain probabilistic distribution. The numerical results assuming a big number of agents (around 4000) show that the agility of the supply chain decreases assuming high-tailed distributions. We also present an empirical study of the seafood supply chain in Mercado del Mar in Guadalajara, Mexico, sampled from interviews to fish wholesalers in 2015. The agility of the empirical supply chain is discussed based on the theoretical findings.
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  • 0976343290

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