Dataset

 

Dataset used for “The early life stages of California yellowtail (Seriola dorsalis) and white seabass (Atractoscion nobilis) respond to food particle taste more than smell.” Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/datasets/m326m709w

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Abstract
  • This dataset was produced as a result of experiments conducted with simple and alginate complex particles that were used to evaluate feeding in California yellowtail and white seabass post larvae. Retention data was collected from a series of retention trials whereby particles were suspended in seawater for various lengths of time and then encapsulated compounds were measured in the particles or in the seawater. Feeding data was obtained from either 1) gut dissections and determined gravimetrically or 2) fluorescent images taken of individual larval gut regions. Notochord lengths were determined from digital images taken with a stereoscope. More specific details regarding methods, results and interpretations can be found in the associated manuscript referenced below Hawkyard et al. (in press).
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Citation
  • Hawkyard, M., Langdon, C., Drawbridge, M., & Stuart, K. (2019). Dataset used for “The early life stages of California yellowtail (Seriola dorsalis) and white seabass (Atractoscion nobilis) respond to food particle taste more than smell.” (Version 1) [Data set]. Oregon State University. https://doi.org/10.7267/M326M709W
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Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
  • This project was supported by Western Regional Aquaculture Center (Award number: 2010-38500- 21758) and by the NOAA Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program (Award number: NA15NMF4270310).
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Additional Information
  • Data used in Hawkyard, M., Stuart, K., Drawbridge, M. & Langdon, C. (In press). The early life stages of California yellowtail (Seriola dorsalis) and white seabass (Atractoscion nobilis) respond to food particle taste more than smell.

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