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Timing of Population Fragmentation in a Vulnerable Minnow, the Umpqua Chub, and the Role of Nonnative Predators Public Deposited

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  • We examined the distribution of Umpqua Chub Oregonichthys kalawatseti, an endemic, vulnerable minnow in western Oregon, and whether six ecological populations (based on distribution patterns) had sufficient genetic cohesion to be considered evolutionary populations. We also evaluated the influence of Holocene geological events and recent nonnative predator introductions on the timing of population formation or fragmentation. Based on data from 10 microsatellite loci, we found evidence for four evolutionary populations of Umpqua Chub. One population, in the Smith River, is isolated by the Umpqua estuary and is more than 100 river kilometers from the other three populations: Elk Creek, Calapooya CreekOlalla Creek, and Cow CreekSouth Umpqua River. Quantile regression was used to examine the timing of genetic divergence among evolutionary populations assuming a genetic isolation-by-distance model. The quantile regression suggested that the genetic differentiation index (F [subscript ST]) should change by at least 0.0002/km; most fragmentation was recent and with similar timing, but the Smith River isolation event may have been about 2-4times older. We could not distinguish whether the timing of the Smith River isolation corresponded to the last major tsunami event or the introduction of Striped Bass Morone saxatilis, a likely predator. All population fragmentation appears to be relatively recent, with the three upstream populations restricted to third- and fourth-order streams, most likely fragmented by either nonnative Smallmouth Bass Micropterus dolomieu, which now dominate sixth-order streams, or in the case of Elk Creek, a dam. The mid-drainage CalapooyaOlalla population was the most genetically diverse and appeared to be a mix of the other populations, which showed a significant isolation-by-distance relationship to this population. We hypothesize that Umpqua Chub populations have formed and fragmented by peripheral isolation from a larger population, the remnant of which is the mid-drainage CalapooyaOlalla population. Received April 20, 2012; accepted August 25, 2012
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  • Kathleen G. O’Malley , Douglas F. Markle & William R. Ardren (2013): Timing of Population Fragmentation in a Vulnerable Minnow, the Umpqua Chub, and the Role of Nonnative Predators, Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, 142:2, 447-457
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  • Funding was provided by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Grants 13420-9-J907 and E-2-54, along with in-kind match from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and Oregon State University (OSU).
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deborah Campbell(deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-15T17:49:00Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 O'MalleyKathleenGFisheriesWildlifeTimingPopulationFragmentation.pdf: 576659 bytes, checksum: 856fdd49ef89affba473672848659ddc (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deborah Campbell (deborah.campbell@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-15T16:47:03Z No. of bitstreams: 1 O'MalleyKathleenGFisheriesWildlifeTimingPopulationFragmentation.pdf: 576659 bytes, checksum: 856fdd49ef89affba473672848659ddc (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-04-15T17:49:00Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 O'MalleyKathleenGFisheriesWildlifeTimingPopulationFragmentation.pdf: 576659 bytes, checksum: 856fdd49ef89affba473672848659ddc (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013-02-11

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