Planning of a Secondary Road Network for Low-Speed Vehicles in Small or Medium-Sized City: Using Google Earth Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/76537199n

This is the author's peer-reviewed final manuscript, as accepted by the publisher. The published article is copyrighted by the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies and can be found at:  http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/154702.aspx.

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  • Planning Secondary Road Network for Low-Speed Vehicles in Small or Medium-Sized City with Google Earth
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  • In response to the growing environmental concern, the use of low speed vehicles (LSVs) on public roadways is gradually increasing in recent years as a short-range alternative to fossil-fueled autos. Primarily designed for protected environments and gated communities, LSVs have a maximum speed limit of 25 mph and are not subjected to the same Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards required for regular passenger cars. This paper presents a comprehensive planning methodology for the development of a secondary low speed roadway network primarily intended for use by LSVs that can be applied to small or medium-sized cities with closely located activity spaces. Typically, small or medium sized cities have limited planning or construction resources, therefore the objective was to develop the low speed network based on the existing road system of the city, with minimal infrastructure modifications. The City’s Transportation Plan and public opinion on route preference were integrated with the road analysis tool of Google Earth to accomplish the network development process. Public involvement in the process through a survey provided valuable insight on users’ route choice behavior; whereas the roadway inventory by City’s Transportation Planning document and Google Earth helped to evaluate city’s actual transportation infrastructure and also helped to analyze the factors influencing LSV users’ route preference behavior. The developed low speed roadway network is expected to provide safe and efficient connectivity from neighborhood areas to major activity centers of the city by LSVs, while minimally affecting the safe operations of regular automobiles.
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  • Jannat, M., & Hunter-Zaworski, K. (2012). Planning secondary road network for low-speed vehicles in small or medium-sized city with google earth. Transportation Research Record, 2307(2307), 60-67. doi: 10.3141/2307-07
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Deanne Bruner (deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-05T20:53:46Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Hunter-ZaworskiKatharineCivilConstructionEngineeringPlanningSecondaryRoad.pdf: 537671 bytes, checksum: 9139ac5c7a2a51f8415ee595fae7184d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Deanne Bruner(deanne.bruner@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-04-05T20:55:20Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Hunter-ZaworskiKatharineCivilConstructionEngineeringPlanningSecondaryRoad.pdf: 537671 bytes, checksum: 9139ac5c7a2a51f8415ee595fae7184d (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-04-05T20:55:20Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Hunter-ZaworskiKatharineCivilConstructionEngineeringPlanningSecondaryRoad.pdf: 537671 bytes, checksum: 9139ac5c7a2a51f8415ee595fae7184d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012

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