Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

The flight and olfactory behavior of checkered beetles (Coleoptera cleridae) predatory on the douglas-fir beetle Public Deposited

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  • Three coleopterous predators associated with the Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins in a second growth forest of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugae menziesii (Mirb. ) Franco) in western Oregon are Enoclerus sphegeus Fabriciup, E, lecontei Wolcott, and Thanasirnus undatulus Say. A study was undertaken with the following objectives: (1) to determine the diurnal and seasonal flight patterns of these predators in relation to the flight of the Douglas-fir beetle, and (2) to determine the mechanism by which these predators locate their prey. Additional studies were conducted to detect the possible production of an olfactory sex attractant by E. sphegeus. Information on the flight of the three species was obtained with six electrically driven rotary insect nets and six sheet metal olfactometers. The attractiveness of various materials to the predators was also tested with the olfactometers. The diurnal flight patterns of E. sphegeus and T. undatulus and apparently E. lecontei are similar to that of the Douglas-fir beetle except that flight of the predators is restricted mainly to a six or seven hour portion of each day. The seasonal flight of E. sphegeus and T. undatulus adults is initiated each spring with the first temperatures of 55° to 60°F. as it is with the Douglas-fir beetle, but E. sphegeus adults apparently fly little after they locate a log infested with Douglas-fir beetles. Adults of E. lecontei appear to fly after the main flight period of the Douglas-fir beetle and is thus not closely associated with this scolytid. Adults of E. sphegeus and T. undatulus are attracted to oleoresin from Douglas-fir, grand fir, and ponderosa pine, and also to alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, lirnonene, and carnphene which are major constituents of these oleoresins. In view of this information it appears that the predators E. sphegeus and T. undatulus locate concentrations of prey insects by being attracted directly to volatile materials escaping from the tree host of the prey insects. No attraction was found with adults of E. lecontei.
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