Identification of reading and study skills related to academic success in each of ten schools at Oregon State University Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/5x21tj22v

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  • Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this study was to identify essential reading and study skills for academic success in each of the schools at Oregon State University. Further, this study related faculty perception of specific skills and scores of subjects who were tested in these skills. The study sought answers to the following questions: 1. Are specific study and reading test scores related to freshman academic achievement in each school? 2. Do "High achievers" and "Low achievers" in each school score significantly differently on tests of specific study and reading skills? 3. Within a school is faculty perception of specific study and reading skills related to study and reading test scores obtained by students enrolled in that school? 4. Is perception of study and reading skills needed for student academic success significantly related among faculty members? Procedures: For this study the product-moment correlation coefficient was used to calculate relationships between students' reading and study skills test scores on each of the scales and their grade point averages. Differences between "High achievers' " and "Low achievers' " test scores were determined by analysis of variance. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was employed to test the relationship of faculty rankings of reading and study skills needed for students' academic success in each school and the students' test scores. Faculty perception was analyzed through utilization of the Spearman rank correlation coefficient, the Kendall coefficient of concordance, and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Findings of the Study: Specific skills were found to be significantly related to grade point averages of students in each school. While some skills correlated more frequently than others with students' academic achievement, a distinctly different pattern of reading and study skills was identified for each of the ten schools. In nine of the ten schools "High achievers' " and "Low achievers' " scores were found to be significantly different on at least one scale which was significantly correlated with academic success in that particular school. A generally negative, if negligible, relationship was found between faculty perception of reading and study skills needed for students' academic achievement and students' scores on those skills. Two scales, Paragraph Comprehension and Problem Solving were ranked by the faculty as significantly related to students' achievement. Paragraph Comprehension was found to correlate significantly with students' grade point average in nine schools. However, Problem Solving correlated significantly with students' grades in only one school. Test scores of Skimming and Scanning correlated more positively with students' grades than scores on any other scale, but it was identified as a least important skill by the majority of the instructors. Faculty members' rankings of essential skills were positively related among all ten schools and significantly related among the majority of the schools. Implications: 1. The results of this study indicate that different patterns of reading and study skills directly related to students' academic achievement in a specific area of concentration can be identified. 2. The results also suggested that instructors' perception of reading and study skills related to student achievement is not necessarily reflected in students' grades. Recommendations 1. Identification of specific skills related to grade point averages at each of the four undergraduate levels within each of the schools within the university. 2. Identification of specific skills related to grade point averages in each division or department within each school of the university. 3. Investigation of whether direct instruction of specific reading and study skills identified as related to academic success in a department significantly affects students' grade point averages. 4. Development of content area materials designed to identify and to teach reading and study skills which may contribute to academic achievement. 5. Analysis of faculty perception of reading and study skills related to academic achievement be undertaken by having instructors identify their assignments and examination questions in terms of the skills they apperceive as needed by students.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Georgeann Booth (gbscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-11-28T00:30:40Z No. of bitstreams: 1 HaseltonShirley1974.pdf: 1133403 bytes, checksum: 33cb725e102b34fcd84f810f6f32b778 (MD5)
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