Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

An assessment of the relationship between culturally specific coping methods and occupational stress for black male counselor educators : Implications for increased diversity in CACREP accredited programs Public Deposited

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  • The absence of Black male counselor educators in CACREP accredited programs is astounding. Out of a pool of 130 CACREP programs, only 31 have at least one Black male full time counselor educator. Although these programs are comprised of approximately 2,000 counselor educators, only 58 of them are Black men. This poses a serious problem for CACREP accredited institutions as it indicates the standards for maintaining a diverse faculty are not being met. It is important that more studies regarding specific coping methods be explored to help meet CACREP standards. Black male counselor educators experience racism, tokenism, feeling left out, not being respected, and unfair pay in addition to rigorous faculty duties (Allison, 2008; Holcomb-McCoy & Bradley, 2006; Salazaar, 2005; Heggins, 2004). Specific coping methods must be employed to combat these specific strains. To that end, the purpose of this quantitative study was to explore the relationship between culturally specific coping methods and occupational strain for Black male counselor educators in CACREP accredited programs. This exploration was initiated through two web surveys: 1) The Black Cultural Coping Scale (BCCS), and 2) The Occupational Strain Inventory – Revised. The BCCS was designed to explore the degree to which culturally specific coping was employed. The OSI-R explored the level of generic occupational stress Black men experienced. Results from BCCS respondents (N=44, 75% response rate) indicated Black men employ culturally specific coping with a significant high degree of frequency. OSI-R results (N=44, 75% response rate) indicated Black men experience a moderate level of occupational strain. A correlation matrix was created comparing the relationship between BCCS and OSI-R variables. There were very few strong relationships between the variables of the two scales. This lack of relationship suggests that Black men may utilize culturally specific coping methods for culturally specific strain, rather than generic strain.
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  • description.provenance : Submitted by Keith Dempsey (dempseyk@onid.orst.edu) on 2009-07-07T02:20:50ZNo. of bitstreams: 1Dissertation. Dempsey.pdf: 3854698 bytes, checksum: 76d659f02eed160d0171c7a19530da34 (MD5)
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