Synecology of the Monotropoideae within Limpy Rock Research Natural Area, Umpqua National Forest, Oregon Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/gb19f8372

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Four aspects of the ecology of members of the Monotropoideae (achiorophyllous Ericaceae, referred to here as "monotropes") are presented: (1) a clarified conceptualization of monotrope nutrition based on a detailed literature review, (2) the relationship of monotrope populations to the plant communities of Limpy Rock RNA, (3) a test of Vreeland's hypothesis concerning the influence of overstory trees on the number of Sarcodes sanguinea plants in a forest stand, (4) the population dynamics of the northernmost known occurrence of Sarcodes san guinea. A literature survey provides insight into the development of concepts concerning the nutritional mode of monotropes. The experimental evidence reviewed showed that the fungi involved have little saprobic ability but are ectomycorrhizal with autotrophic plants. Hence, the concept "epiparasite" can be used to describe an indirect relationship in the life history of monotropes. With consideration of the operational environment of monotropes, however, it can be concluded that the term "epiparasite" is not appropriately used in the context of the nutritional mode of monotropes. Members of the Monotropoideae can be viewed as parasites of their mycorrhizal fungi. Some evidence showed growth of the fungi was stimulated by the presence of monotropes. Since the term "parasite" has negative connotations in general usage, the terms 'obligate mycotroph" and "mycotrophic" may be preferred when referring to members of the Monotropoideae. "Mycotrophic" could be strictly applied to only those organisms which depend on fungi for energy; however, the term has long been used in a broad sense interchangeably with "mycorrhizal." Limpy Rock Research Natural Area is located in the south central portion of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon. The 751 ha (1879 ac.) tract encompasses most of the drainage of Dog Creek. Elevation ranges from 525 to 1305 m (1750 - 4350 ft.). The high species diversity of the Limpy Rock area and local concentration of all eight western monotrope species, provided excellent and possibly unique research opportunities. Coniferous forest vegetation was classified by TWINS PAN into six community types: Pseudotsuga menziesiilAcer circinatum (PSME/ACCI), Pseudotsuga menziesiilCornus nuttalliilBerberis nervosa (PS ME/CONU/B ENE), Pseudotsuga rnenziesii-Arbutus menziesii/Gaultheria shallon-Berberis nervosa/Pleridiurn aquilinum (PS ME-A RME/GAS H- BENE/PTAQ), Pseudotsuga menziesii-Calocedrus decurrens/Gaultheria shallo n-Berberis nervosa (PS MECADE/ GAS H-B ENE), Pseudotsuga menziesii-Calocedrus decurrens/Gauliheria shallon-Berberis nervosa (PS ME-PILA/GAS H-B ENE), Pseudotsuga menziesii- Abies concolor/Berberis nervosal Xerophyllurn tenax (PSME-ABCO/ BENE/XETE). Community types were related to several general environmental measures by detrended correspondence analysis and correlation analysis. Allotropa virgata is strongly preferential to plots at the dryer end of the moisture gradient. Monotropa hypopithys shows a preference for higher elevation and cooler types. Pterospora andromedea was not found in any plots but was noted to be widespread throughout the RNA. Hernitoines con gestwn, Monotropa uniflora, Fityopus californica, and Pleuricosporafiinbrioiata were largely restricted to dryer types. No monotropes were found in plots of the PSME/CONU/BENE or PSME-ARME/GASH-BENE/PTAQ community types. Vreeland's (1980) hypothesis concerning predicting the number of Sarcodes in a stand was reviewed and discussed. In particular, his "Influence Factor" was tested with a data base of over 2000 measurements. The results show his hypothesis to be invalid. Population monitoring of the northernmost known population of Sarcodes sanguinea showed that flowering of individual plants in subsequent years was low in frequency. Despite the low rate of flowering recurrence, population levels were relatively stable over the five years of monitoring.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • Master files scanned at 600 ppi (256 Grayscale) using Capture Perfect 3.0 on a Canon DR-9080C in TIF format. PDF derivative scanned at 300 ppi (256 B&W), using Capture Perfect 3.0, on a Canon DR-9080C. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Joe Nguyen (jnscanner@gmail.com) on 2008-11-17T17:25:29Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Luoma_Daniel_L_1987.pdf: 1436571 bytes, checksum: 5cc3f27cd5af7cad1acffa4e3183ca4c (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2008-11-17T19:55:35Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Luoma_Daniel_L_1987.pdf: 1436571 bytes, checksum: 5cc3f27cd5af7cad1acffa4e3183ca4c (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-11-17T19:55:34Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Luoma_Daniel_L_1987.pdf: 1436571 bytes, checksum: 5cc3f27cd5af7cad1acffa4e3183ca4c (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Linda Kathman(linda.kathman@oregonstate.edu) on 2008-11-17T19:42:41Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Luoma_Daniel_L_1987.pdf: 1436571 bytes, checksum: 5cc3f27cd5af7cad1acffa4e3183ca4c (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/08/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items