Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

How Experienced Supervisors Experience Using Supervision to Promote Self and Relational Awareness: Two Studies on Supervisors’ Overall Experiences Using Supervision to Promote Self and Relational Awareness and Supervisors’ Experiences Deciding to Use Supervision to Promote Self and Relational Awareness Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/ht24wr441

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  • Counselor self and relational awareness (SRA) is an important aspect of counselor training and development. Counselor education programs engage students in a variety of practices targeted towards enhancing SRA. Although supervision is regularly used to promote SRA, there is no existing research that focuses on how supervisors experience using supervision to promote SRA. This research consists of two studies analyzing how experienced supervisors experience using supervision to promote SRA. The first study is called, Experienced Supervisors’ Experiences Using Supervision to Promote SRA in Supervisees. The second study is called Experienced Supervisors’ Experiences Deciding to Use Supervision to Promote SRA. I utilized the qualitative research method of phenomenology for both studies. This approach enabled me to hear participants’ voices as they described their common experiences with the phenomenon. Participants for this research met the following criteria: they use supervision to promote SRA, they have some experience supervising second year masters’ level students and at least five years’ experience supervising and have received some supervisor training. The data collection consisted of one round of in-depth, semi-structured interviews followed by an email questionnaire. The data was analyzed to obtain rich, textured descriptions. I used various strategies to increase trustworthiness of the research. These strategies included reflexivity, bracketing, peer debriefing and member checking. Issues of transferability were addressed through being transparent about the researcher, context, processes, participants and the relationships between myself and the participants. The first study (N=8) explored the experiences of experienced supervisors who use supervision to promote SRA. The interview questions stemmed from the main research question, “How do supervisors experience using supervision to promote SRA?” The four main themes found in this study were: values, beliefs, and past experiences as supervisors and supervisees as the backdrop of the experience of using supervision to promote SRA; experiencing vulnerability as both the means and goal; the ongoing experience of working toward strong, safe relationships; a gift and a burden. The second study (N=8) explored the experiences of experienced supervisors deciding to use supervision to promote SRA in supervisees. The interview questions flowed out of the main research question, “How do supervisors experience deciding to use supervision to promote SRA. The four main themes found in this study were: context for valuing SRA based both on innate qualities and past experiences as supervisee and supervisor; becoming aware of an area for growth; assessing readiness when deciding to use supervision to promote SRA; balancing competing needs while deciding to use supervision to promote SRA. There are several implications for this research. The findings define several common aspects of how supervisors experience using supervision to promote SRA. It could be helpful for new counselors and supervisors to learn about how their values, beliefs and past experiences are part of the backdrop for becoming a supervisor who values using supervision to promote SRA. Counselor education and supervisor training can be enhanced by learning about the importance of vulnerability and safety when using supervision to promote SRA. The theme of balancing competing needs while deciding to use supervision to promote SRA could help new supervisors to make conscious choices in supervision.
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