Model of late Pleistocene-Holocene variations in rate of sediment accumulation : Panama Basin, eastern equatorial Pacific Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/m900nw62w

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  • The assumption of constant quartz accumulation for the deep-sea sediment core Y69-106P, taken in the Panama Basin, has been used to date the core and construct a sedimentation rate versus time curve for it. Stratigraphic control for the calculated time scale includes three carbon-14 measurements, the extinction of the radiolarian Stylatractus universus, and correlation with oxygen isotope curves from other dated cores. The model sedimentation rates and sediment composition data allow the determination of sediment accumulation rates for calcium carbonate, opaline silica, and remaining "detritus". Fluctuations in calcium carbonate accumulation rates correlate closely with variations in oxygen isotope ratios in biogenous carbonate from two other equatorial Pacific sediment cores. High oxygen isotope ratios correlate with high calcium carbonate accumulation rates. Opaline silica accumulation rates reflect changes in the dominance of radiolarian fossil groups which can be related to surface circulation in the Panama Basin. The successive maxima in opal and calcium accumulation rates and the oxygen isotope ratios in Y69-106P suggest that at the end of the last glacial period, the rate of calcium carbonate dissolution increased in the Panama Basin first, to be followed by a decrease in the intensity of the eastern equatorial Pacific upwelling, and finally the volume of continental glaciers decreased. Spectral analysis of the rate of accumulation of calcium carbonate in Y69-106P and of the oxygen isotope record of core V28-238 indicate the presence of a 23,000 year periodicity. Analysis of opal accumulation rate suggest a 100,000 year periodicity. These two periodicities are found in fluctuations in the earth's orbital parameters. The eccentricity of the orbit fluctuates with an average period of 98,000 years and the precession of the equinoxes changes with a 22,000 year period.
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