A comparison of the effect of oral versus written lesson closure on the achievement of seventh and eighth grade students in social studies Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/ng451m01w

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  • This was an experimental study which compared two different instructional methods, oral lesson closure versus written lesson closure, on the achievement of 156 junior high school students in social studies. This study was composed of two duplicate experiments. Experiment I was conducted with 71 seventh grade social studies students at School A, and Experiment II was conducted with 85 eighth grade history students at School B. A pretest posttest control group design was used for both experiments. The control group was given oral closure and the experimental group was given written closure. Posttest scores were compared using analysis of covariance at the .05 confidence level. The treatment was a lesson closure activity in which students summarized major points of the lesson orally in pairs or by writing a paragraph. Closure occurred in a ten minute time period at the conclusion of all instruction for the lesson objective. Each treatment was given to two seventh grade classes and to two eighth grade classes for six weeks. Although this study did not strongly identify either oral lesson closure or written lesson closure as more effective than the other, it did show both instructional methods to be similarly effective in promoting mastery of social studies facts. Lesson closure is an important strategy for teachers to use to help students learn. This study raises an interesting question regarding age and school performance. The findings from both experiments indicated that younger students performed significantly better in academic achievement than older students in the same grade. Could younger students summarize more skillfully or did they comprehend lesson content more readily? Further research is suggested regarding the issue of adolescent age and academic performance.
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