Distribution patterns of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in relation to environment Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/v979v586c

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • Direct observation of a known number of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus), within the Cedar Creek study enclosure in the Tillamook Burn, Oregon, was carried on throughout 1964. Observations were made from three huts located outside of the enclosure on surrounding prominences. During this period, 1,410 hours of observational time yielded 6,746 sightings of deer. The distribution and activities of these deer were related to forage availability, plant communities, and climatic conditions. Extremes and sharp changes in temperature influenced deer activity. Deer became inactive when temperatures exceeded 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Both low temperature and sudden drops in temperature resulted in greatly reduced activity. Deer showed seasonal preferences for huckleberry-salal, big-leafed maple, and alder plant communities, while use of the vine maple community remained high throughout the year. The thimbleberry and bracken fern communities received relatively low use by deer. Plotted ratios of these preferences indicate winter survival value for deer in the juxtaposition of certain plant communities and a nonrandom distribution of deer. Seasonal distribution of deer was also influenced by elevation Deer sighted above 1,500 feet msl made up 84.7 percent of the total annual sightings. Seasonal peaks of daily activity were recorded as follows: midday peaks during January and February followed by early morning peaks during March, April, and May; slight late morning peaks and high twilight peaks in June through August; high early morning peaks and slighter twilight peaks in September; peaks in early morning and at midday with some revival at twilight in October; high activity throughout the day with a peak at midday in November; and high activity from mid-morning to twilight during December. Home range size was influenced by sex, age, available forage, water, cover, and prevailing weather. The largest annual home range was 312 horizontal acres and the smallest 86 horizontal acres. Size of monthly home ranges varied from 12.8 to 39.6 percent of the annual home range sizes. There was considerable variability in the distribution of deer among major land units.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Copyright
Date Issued
Degree Level
Degree Name
Degree Field
Degree Grantor
Commencement Year
Advisor
Academic Affiliation
Non-Academic Affiliation
Subject
Rights Statement
Peer Reviewed
Language
Digitization Specifications
  • File scanned at 300 ppi (Monochrome, 8-bit Grayscale) using ScandAll PRO 1.8.1 on a Fi-6670 in PDF format. CVista PdfCompressor 4.0 was used for pdf compression and textual OCR.
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Tamera Ontko (toscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2011-08-03T20:37:47Z No. of bitstreams: 1 MillerFrankLawrence1966.pdf: 1183712 bytes, checksum: 056e3c70866640af9546310bbafb7990 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-08-19T16:37:54Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MillerFrankLawrence1966.pdf: 1183712 bytes, checksum: 056e3c70866640af9546310bbafb7990 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2011-08-19T16:43:43Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 MillerFrankLawrence1966.pdf: 1183712 bytes, checksum: 056e3c70866640af9546310bbafb7990 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1965-06-11
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2011-08-19T16:43:43Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 MillerFrankLawrence1966.pdf: 1183712 bytes, checksum: 056e3c70866640af9546310bbafb7990 (MD5)

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 08/15/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items