Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Studies on selected topics of Pasteurella multocida infection in laboratory rabbits Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/w3763995k

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  • The purpose of the dissertation was to investigate (certain aspects of) the host-parasite relationship between the laboratory rabbit and the pathogen, Pasteurella multocida. The focus of the present endeavor was to provide new insight into this field of study by the adaptation of novel microbiologic approaches and the application of serologic methodologies, namely an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical techniques. The major accomplishments of the dissertation were: 1. The establishment of a comprehensive frequency distribution of P. multocida recovered from various anatomical sites among naturally infected laboratory rabbits. The order of decreasing frequency of isolation among 137 infected rabbits was determined: oropharynx- intrapharyngeal ostium, tonsils, nasopharynx, trachea, middle ears, nasal passages, sinus cavities, distal vagina, conjunctiva, uterus, prepuce, and lung; 2. The development of a nasopharyngeal culture method for detecting the carrier state of P. multocida in clinically normal rabbits; 3. A detailed description of selecting a particular bacterial strain as an appropriate candidate for the purification of heat-stable outer membrane components for use as an antigen in an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. One such candidate, designated R11146, was shown to have a diagnostic sensitivity of 93.8% (n=336), and a diagnostic specificity of 99.7% (n=856); 4. The application of both methods provided a practical approach for the derivation, establishment, and maintenance of Pasteurella-free breeding colonies. These methodologies were also shown to be powerful tools for elucidating such fundamental aspects of pasteurellosis, as natural exposure time required for seroand culture-conversion; 5. Finally, the employment of immunohistochemical techniques for the localization of bacteria within infected tissues implicated the macrophage as an essential participant in the pathogenesis of the disease.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-05-29T15:56:40Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HolmesHarveyThomas1989.pdf: 2624512 bytes, checksum: 8e48bfd786bdfcc806d59bf6be42f5ec (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2013-07-29T16:46:12Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 HolmesHarveyThomas1989.pdf: 2624512 bytes, checksum: 8e48bfd786bdfcc806d59bf6be42f5ec (MD5) Previous issue date: 1988-06-03
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Black(patricia.black@oregonstate.edu) on 2013-07-29T16:46:12Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 HolmesHarveyThomas1989.pdf: 2624512 bytes, checksum: 8e48bfd786bdfcc806d59bf6be42f5ec (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Kim Stowell (ksscannerosu@gmail.com) on 2013-05-17T19:14:20Z No. of bitstreams: 1 HolmesHarveyThomas1989.pdf: 2624512 bytes, checksum: 8e48bfd786bdfcc806d59bf6be42f5ec (MD5)

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