Graduate Thesis Or Dissertation

 

Facilitating the Community College Social Experience : The Role of Faculty on Social Integration within the Classroom Public Deposited

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https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/graduate_thesis_or_dissertations/x633f4357

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  • Background: Social interaction among peers on a campus of higher education has long been considered an important part of the college student experience, in particular for the first-term students transitioning into college life. Students who socially connect with peers on campus tend to persist at higher rates, while other benefits include increased personal development, engagement, sense of belonging, support networks, and college navigation skills. However, community college students who commute are dramatically less likely to experience social interactions with peers than residential students. As a result, recent attention has pointed to the classroom as the place where social interaction must occur for commuter students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to understand why and how selected faculty promoted social interaction in the community college classroom. The guiding research questions of this study were (a) According to participating community college faculty, what is the value in promoting social integration in the first-term classroom? (b) What are practices used by community college faculty to promote social integration in the first-term classroom? Subjects: This study used a snowball sampling method, which relied on the referrals of administrators and faculty to nominate instructors who fit a specific criteria: (a) teach classes that have the highest population of first-term students, and (b) have a reputation as instructors who promote social interaction in the community college classroom. The sample size was 13--seven writing instructors and six mathematics instructors. Research Design: Bounded multiple case study, qualitative. Data Collection: Interviews were conducted with each of the 13 participants, each lasting approximately one hour. All of the participants were given transcripts of their individual interviews with the opportunity to include more information or amend statements given during the initial interview. Study participants were also asked to confirm the thematic findings extracted from their individual interviews. None of the participants disagreed with the themes. Analysis: All interviews were transcribed, and the data were then coded twice. Thematic analysis was applied to each interview, and then a cross-case analysis was used to generate comprehensive themes for the entire study. Study participants were also asked to confirm the thematic findings extracted from their individual interviews. None of the participants disagreed with the themes. Findings: According to participants in the study, the value of promoting social interaction in their first-term classes can be found in: (a) enhanced learning, (b) appealing atmosphere, (c) student development and growth, (d) membership in supportive community, (e) success, and (f) safety and comfort. Participating instructors promote social interaction by (a) establishing social interaction early in the term, (b) emphasizing student names, (c) having defined instructional approach, (d) creating safety and comfort, and (e) connecting students. Conclusions: The themes that emerged from the data indicate that there is qualitative value to both the student and the instructor when social interaction is present in a community college classroom. The findings are supported by existing literature, which suggests that there is triangulated credibility and believability among the cross-case analysis generated themes. The findings suggest a variety of implications for practice to promote social interaction within the community college classroom. This study also suggests further research is needed to better understand how social interaction practices impact the student, and how these beneficial practices can be delivered effectively.
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  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Julie Kurtz(julie.kurtz@oregonstate.edu) on 2016-03-11T22:21:01Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1232 bytes, checksum: bb87e2fb4674c76d0d2e9ed07fbb9c86 (MD5) ButlerPaisleyWilliamJ2016.pdf: 715879 bytes, checksum: 14ec617b4f6870e07f7cdd7e4a0e9582 (MD5)
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  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2016-03-11T22:33:03Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 1232 bytes, checksum: bb87e2fb4674c76d0d2e9ed07fbb9c86 (MD5) ButlerPaisleyWilliamJ2016.pdf: 715879 bytes, checksum: 14ec617b4f6870e07f7cdd7e4a0e9582 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2016-03-03
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  • 2017-08-23 to 2018-03-11

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