Phytoplankton pigment patterns and wind forcing off central California Public Deposited

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/concern/defaults/h702q785n

Descriptions

Attribute NameValues
Creator
Abstract or Summary
  • We use a 4-year time series of high-resolution coastal zone color scanner imagery to study mesoscale variability in phytoplankton pigment (as a surrogate for biomass) distributions off central California during the spring–summer upwelling season. We use empirical orthogonal functions to decompose the time series of spatial images into its dominant modes of variability. Similarly, we analyze wind fields derived from the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center pressure fields. The results from these analyses are used to investigate the coupling between wind forcing of the upper ocean and phytoplankton distributions on mesoscales. Prior to the spring transition, wind stress is dominated by strong northward conditions, and pigment is low and relatively uniform throughout the California Current domain. The first strong southward wind event soon results in a bloom of phytoplankton that is also uniformly distributed offshore. Nearshore values fluctuate relatively little in response to variations in wind forcing. After the spring transition, the wind becomes more steady (southward) and the fluctuations are dominated by changes in the strength of the curl. During southward events, the curl tends to become more positive. Depending on the fluctuations and strength of these curl episodes, filaments begin to form at particular locations. The overall pigment concentration in the California Current drops as a larger fraction of the pigment is distributed within the filaments. The filaments also tend to become shorter during this period, which starts soon after the spring transition and usually reaches its maximum intensity in early summer. Winds (and curl) become much weaker in the mid-July to August period, and the filaments become much less prominent in terms of concentration and their length increases. Isolated wind events occasionally reinvigorate the filaments. A final bloom in the fall occasionally appears with spatial structure similar to the spring bloom. We conclude that wind forcing, in particular the curl of the wind stress, plays an important role in the distribution of phytoplankton pigment in the California Current. Although the underlying dynamics, especially of the filaments, may be dominated by processes other than forcing by wind stress curl (such as eddies or topographically induced instabilities), it appears that curl may force the variability of the filaments and hence the pigment patterns.
Resource Type
Date Available
Date Issued
Citation
  • Abbott, Mark R., and B. Barksdale, 1991, Phytoplankton pigment patterns and wind forcing off central California, J. Geophys. Res., 96, 14,649–14,667.
Rights Statement
Funding Statement (additional comments about funding)
Publisher
Language
Replaces
Additional Information
  • description.provenance : Submitted by Linda Lamb (llamb@coas.oregonstate.edu) on 2010-04-14T00:28:43Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Abbott Barksdale JGR 1991.pdf: 5495834 bytes, checksum: 3d174fdfaabf0f130c60f424cf082e96 (MD5)
  • description.provenance : Made available in DSpace on 2010-04-14T00:49:35Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Abbott Barksdale JGR 1991.pdf: 5495834 bytes, checksum: 3d174fdfaabf0f130c60f424cf082e96 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1991
  • description.provenance : Approved for entry into archive by Mark Abbott(mark@coas.oregonstate.edu) on 2010-04-14T00:49:35Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Abbott Barksdale JGR 1991.pdf: 5495834 bytes, checksum: 3d174fdfaabf0f130c60f424cf082e96 (MD5)
ISSN
  • 0148-0227

Relationships

In Administrative Set:
Last modified: 07/25/2017

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Citations:

EndNote | Zotero | Mendeley

Items